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Trump Blasts Fox News, Chris Wallace as Network Takes Leftward Turn

President also noted the cable channel was bringing on Democrat Adam Schiff

By David Kamioner | December 15, 2019

President Donald Trump, in a tweet he sent out on Saturday evening, went after Fox News — specifically, its news division — for “trying so hard to be politically correct.”

The president’s specific bone of contention seemed to be that Fox News had noted it would be interviewing disgraced former FBI director James Comey this weekend, as well as Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), chair of the House Judiciary Committee.

Schiff, of course, is one of the House Democrats leading the highly partisan charge against the president.

Here’s what the president wrote about it all.

See his tweet here.

The changes at Fox the president mentions in his tweet have been noticeable in the Fox News division, not the opinion sectors. Many people — both media watchers and everyday Americans — have commented on this over the past weeks and months.

The other offerings on the Fox News Channel — such as the popular morning program “Fox & Friends” as well as the channel’s nightly lineup of successful opinion shows, all among the highest rated programs on cable television — have remained staunchly conservative and friendly to the president.

The Fox News interviews with both Comey and Schiff took place and were shown on Sunday; Fox News anchor Chris Wallace conducted them.

In recent speech at The Newseum in Washington, D.C., Wallace sharply criticized the president as an opponent of freedom of the press.

But Wallace conversely and ironically, given his own words, termed the media’s bias against the president “a big mistake.”

Trump has good reason to be suspicious that Wallace can be anywhere near fair or balanced, given his recent speech against Trump and other commentary he’s shared in relation to stories regarding the president.

Traditional journalists of generations ago, such as like Edward R. Murrow of CBS, would have been mortified that a reporter such as Wallace — while working for an allegedly objective news outlet — would be as publicly partisan as Wallace has been and yet not recuse himself from stories regarding the subject of his public comments, as this analyst sees it.

Yet Murrow lived at a time when professional standards and ethics within the Fourth Estate were much different — and much higher — than they are today among the mainstream media.

In Wallace’s interview with Comey, the world saw the disgraced former FBI leader try to portray himself as a kindler, gentler version of himself, dressed as he was without a tie and wearing an earth-toned fall ensemble likely recommended by his handlers, in this writer’s view.

Especially as the partisan push toward the impeachment of President Trump looks more and more problematic for Democrats, Comey — significantly — admitted more than once to Wallace that he had been “wrong” about certain things.

And what were those things? Said Wallace to Comey about the recently released report from DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz, “Seventeen significant errors in the FISA process — and you say that it was handled in a thoughtful and appropriate way.”

“He’s right. I was wrong,” said this new version of Comey on Sunday. “I was overconfident in the procedures that the FBI and Justice had built over 20 years. I thought they were robust enough. It’s incredibly hard to get a FISA. I was overconfident in those. Because he’s right. There was real sloppiness — 17 things that either should’ve been in the applications or at least discussed and characterized differently. It was not acceptable and so he’s right. I was wrong.”

Wallace said, “But you make it sound like you’re a bystander, an eyewitness. You were the director of the FBI while a lot of this was going on, sir.”

“Sure,” said Comey in an offhand manner. “I’m responsible for it. That’s why I’m telling you I was wrong. I was overconfident as director in our procedures and it’s important that a leader be accountable and transparent. If I were still director, I’d be saying exactly the same thing that Chris Wray [the current FBI director] is saying, which is, we are going to get to the bottom of this. Because the most important question is, is it systemic? Are there problems in other cases?”

Questions can be asked — as the president himself raised — about why Comey was even given this platform to share his views.

Because there was still plenty Comey would not admit to — and plenty of problems at the FBI, formerly under his direction, that he did not address or take responsibility for in the interview.

He also never apologized to the president.

See this tweet — and share your thoughts:

This piece originally appeared in LifeZette and is used by permission.

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